The Canzoniere, Or, Rerum Vulgarium Fragmenta

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Indiana University Press, 1996 - Broj stranica: 754
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Petrarch's personification of the hapless lover has become one of our major models. Indeed, in many of his poems of the pain and the bitter pleasure of love, we recognize a vivid and timely picture of existential man. Humble sinner, aesthete, contemplative, man of the world, secretly tormented spirit, droll observer, and advocate of life, Petrarch's protagonist in these poems possesses a personality as complex as was the nature of his time. The 366 poems of Petrarch's Canzoniere form one of the most influential books of poetry in Western literature. Varied in form style, and subject matter, these "scattered rhymes" contain metaphors and conceits that have been absorbed into the literature and language of love. In this definitive bilingual edition of the Canzoniere, Mark Musa provides verse translations, annotations, and an introduction co-authored with Barbara Manfredi.

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THE Canzoniere
2
Notes and Commentary
521
Index of First Lines
733
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O autoru (1996)

Son of an exiled Florentine clerk, Petrarch was born in Arezzo, Italy, but was raised at the court of the Pope in Avignon in southern France. He studied the classics in France and continued his education at the University of Bologna in Italy. Less than a year after his return to Avignon in 1326, Petrarch fell in love with the woman he referred to as Laura in his most famous poetry. Although he never revealed her true name, nor, apparently, ever expressed his love to her directly, he made her immortal with his Canzoniere (date unknown), or songbook, a collection of lyric poems and sonnets that rank among the most beautiful written in Italian, or in any other language. Like the major Italian poet Dante Alighieri, Petrarch chose to write his most intimate feelings in his native Italian, rather than the Latin customary at that time. Petrarch used Latin for his more formal works, however. He incorrectly assumed that he would be remembered for the Latin works, but it was his Italian lyric poetry that influenced both the content and form of all subsequent European poetry. Petrarch's sonnet form was prized by English poets as an alternative to English poet William Shakespeare's sonnet form.

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