The Origins of the Slavic Nations: Premodern Identities in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus

Naslovnica
Cambridge University Press, 7. ruj 2006.
1 Recenzija
This book documents developments in the countries of eastern Europe, including the rise of authoritarian tendencies in Russia and Belarus, as well as the victory of the democratic 'Orange Revolution' in Ukraine, and poses important questions about the origins of the East Slavic nations and the essential similarities or differences between their cultures. It traces the origins of the modern Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian nations by focusing on pre-modern forms of group identity among the Eastern Slavs. It also challenges attempts to 'nationalize' the Rus' past on behalf of existing national projects, laying the groundwork for understanding of the pre-modern history of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. The book covers the period from the Christianization of Kyivan Rus' in the tenth century to the reign of Peter I and his eighteenth-century successors, by which time the idea of nationalism had begun to influence the thinking of East Slavic elites.
 

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Sadržaj

2 What happened to the Rus Land?
49
3 The Lithuanian solution
85
4 The rise of Muscovy
122
5 The making of the Ruthenian nation
161
6 Was there a reunification?
203
7 The invention of Russia
250
8 Ruthenia Little Russia Ukraine
299
Conclusions
354

Introduction
1
1 The origins of Rus
10

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Popularni odlomci

Stranica xii - Our land is great and rich, but there is no order in it. Come to rule and reign over us.
Stranica xii - Discord thus ensued among them, and they began to war one against another. They said to themselves, "Let us seek a prince who may rule over us and judge us according to the Law.
Stranica xix - See ye these hills? So shall the favor of God shine upon them that on this spot a great city shall arise, and God shall erect many churches therein." He drew near the hills, and having blessed them, he set up a cross. After offering his prayer to God, he descended from the hill on which Kiev was subsequently built, and continued his journey up the Dnieper. He then reached the Slavs at the point where Novgorod is now situated. He saw these people existing according to their customs, and on observing...
Stranica xiii - They also spoke other false things which out of modesty may not be written down. Vladimir listened to them, for he was fond of women and indulgence, regarding which he heard with pleasure. But circumcision and abstinence from pork and wine were disagreeable to him. "Drinking," said he, "is the joy of the Russes.

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